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Nov 26, 2014

10 wonderful winter containers



If inspiration is what you're after, we've rounded up ten winter planters found on Houzz that would look great displayed on a front porch, walkway or balcony.







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Read more in Gardens and Container Gardening
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Nov 20, 2014

Rigatoni Pasta Pie


http://livelovepasta.com/2013/04/rigatoni-pasta-pie/

Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Isn’t this one of the coolest pies ever? Homemade red sauce, a thick layer of golden brown and bubbly cheese, and a rigatoni pasta that not only lends itself well to thick, meaty sauce…but actually STANDS! Can you believe it?!
When we decided to give this recipe a try we didn’t have high expectations that it would actually stand once the spring form pan was released. It seemed too good to be true. But it totally worked…and it turned out perfect!!
This meal came together fast, the longest step was arranging the pasta in the pan, which took less than 10 minutes. Kara, Cliff and I were really impressed! I love pasta, I especially love cheesy baked pasta, and I love love love the presentation of this pie.
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Here’s what you’ll need
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
in a large pan brown the meat and cook onion
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
add the tomatoes, crushing the tomatoes with your hands
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Add a layer of sauce to the bottom of the spring form pan
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Tightly place the cooked pasta in the pan, standing the pasta up
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Add more sauce on top, then the mozzarella, then sprinkle parmesan on top
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Bake about 30 minutes, will be golden brown on top
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
How cool!! So delicious too!
Rigatoni Pasta Pie recipe pictures
Rigatoni Pasta Pie
Serves 6
A delicious Rigatoni dish made with homemade red sauce, a thick layer of golden brown and bubbly cheese, and a pasta that not only lends itself well to thick, meaty sauce…but actually STANDS!
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Ingredients
  1. 1 tablespoon olive oil
  2. ½ pound ground sirloin
  3. 3 cloves garlic, minced
  4. ½ an onion, finely diced
  5. a pinch crushed red pepper flakes
  6. salt and pepper, to taste
  7. 1 (28 ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes
  8. 1 pound rigatoni pasta
  9. 2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese
  10. 2 cups mozzarella, shredded
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the ground sirloin and diced onion and cook until meat is browned, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, crushed red pepper, and season with salt and pepper then sauté for another minute. Add the can of tomatoes, crushing the tomatoes with your hands. Simmer on medium heat, stirring occasionally, 20 minutes.
  3. In the meantime, cook the pasta until it’s slightly undercooked. Drain and set aside. Lightly oil a 9-inch springform pan. Spread a thin layer of sauce of the bottom of the pan, then tightly pack the rigatoni in the pan, standing the pasta on its ends.
  4. Pour the sauce over the pasta. Sprinkle the top evenly with mozzarella cheese, then sprinkle with parmesan cheese.
  5. Bake approximately 30 minutes, until cheese is browned and bubbly. Top with fresh basil, if desired. Let sit 15 minutes before serving.
Adapted from Bev Cooks

Nov 16, 2014

Tire letters and Whitewalls etc...

Dress up your car with Tire letters , made with rubber not painted !Check the link below for more pictures and info. 
http://www.pneugraphicds.ca/

Do you know what I really love? Wine.

Do you know what I really love? Wine.
Do you know what I love even more? Herbal wine!
You can drink it without the guilt. After all, herbal wines have been used as medicine for thousands of years dating back to the Ancient Egyptians. Alcohols help to break down the medicinal constituents of herbs and plants which makes them more bio-available to the body.
If you want to make your own herbal wines then pick up a good bottle of wine from your local store, gather all the herbs you need, and then follow the tutorial revealed here…

How To Make Your Own Herbal Wine

 


Herbal wines
date back thousands of years. Egyptian wine jars have been found with residues of herbs and resins. It makes sense, as we now know that alcohol breaks down the medicinal constituents of plants, making it more bio-available to the body. That’s why we make alcohol extracts as herbal tinctures to deliver botanical chemicals to our body. The famous 12th century German mystic, Hildegard of Bingen, recommended herbal wines such as lung wort wine for emphysema, honey-parsley wine for heart pain, and unsweetened lavender wine for congested liver. Bitters infused in alcohol have been used in Europe for several hundred years. They usually contain bitter herbs that help with digestion by stimulating bile juices. Bitters have also been traditionally added to beer for the same reason.  Angostura Bitters are a famous member of this category and are well-used in hundres of cocktails for a splash of complexity, and to this day only 5 people in the world know the well-kept secret of the herbs used in this special recipe. Though this mixture was hoped to help soldiers in WWI suffering from severe fevers and digestive disorders, it now serves to enliven many of our most special happy hour drinks today. Bitters are usually made with alcohols other than wines, but it might be fun to experiment with bitter herbs when making a more medicinal wine.
There are lots of super tasty concoctions that can be made in your own kitchen. I often make herbal simple syrups to add to gin or vodka drinks for something herbaceous, but it’s really fun to go directly to the source and create an alcoholic beverage that is lively and complex all on its own! This is why going the herbal wine route is worthwhile. Most people can afford a decent white or red wine to start with.
Making Herbal Wines
1. Place Herbs in a bottle (1 oz herbs to 1 pint wine)
2. Pour wine over herbs to fill the bottle (generally a ‘sweeter’ wine w/ about 12% alcohol)
3. Cap tightly and shake well
4. Store in a cool, dark place
5. Shake well every day for 2 weeks
6. Strain herbs.
7. Add sugar or honey to taste (optional), particularly for liqueurs
8. Some liqueurs need maturation time, in which case you might wait a month or more.
NOTE: herbal wines should last about a year. Herbal liqueurs may last longer.
rose infused vodka Rose Petal Wine
(Medicinal Uses: for headaches, heart disease, stomach pain & fever)
600 g rose petals (Rugosa preferred), dried and not sprayed
10 liters combination grape juice and young wine OR all young wine
1. Tie rose petals in a small bag & place in a container with the liquids
2. Infuse in a dark place (covered) for 3 months
3. Filter, pour into a sterilized bottle or jar and store again.